Friday, August 17, 2018

laurel tree in a Bloomingdale front yard available for donation

See this 08-16-2018 message:

There’s a lovely laurel tree in my front yard that has outgrown its space and needs to come out. It’s about 6 feet tall and 5 feet across. It’s free for anyone who wants it, especially if you can help dig it out. Contact Natalya_scimeca at yahoo.com.



Friends of McMillan Park invite you to a history walking tour around McMillan Park -- Sunday, 09-23-2018

See this event announcement from the Ward 5 list:


Join us for a history walking tour around McMillan Park on Sunday, September 23rd at 9:30am (rain date: Sun. Sept. 30th)!

Dear Friend of McMillan Park,
          About a month from now on Sunday, September 23rd, we are planning another history walking tour through Bloomingdale and around the perimeter of McMillan Park. Once again, we are fortunate to have our neighbor and friend Paul Cerruti leading the tour.  Paul has compiled a tremendous amount of detail about the park and its role in our neighborhood through the years since it was first opened to the public. This will cover a lot of the information presented in history walks we did in 2017, and in our March and May 2018 tours, that were very well attended and enjoyed! The weather likely will be ideal for such a walking tour. 
 
          The tour will showcase McMillan Park, its vistas, unique history, and connection to historic landmarks in the Bloomingdale neighborhood.  The first part of the walk will include information and bonus highlights about the history and development of Bloomingdale, much of it in anticipation of the opening of McMillan Park.
 
          The tour will last about two hours and will start at the triangular park opposite the Big Bear Café (located at the corner of 1st St. and R St. NW) on Sunday, September 23rd at 9:30am (rain date Sun., Sept. 30th at 9:30am). Light refreshments will be served and a selection of some of our favorite mounted art photos of McMillan Park offered for sale at the end of the tour, as well as some lovely greeting cards of those same photos!
 
          Please register by sending an email to restoremcmillan@gmail.com or calling Kirby at 202 213-2690.  We are limiting the tour to 30 people to ensure all who join it can hear easily and participate fully. So please register early to guarantee that you'll be able to be part of this special day.  

          Kindly note, a suggested donation of $20 in advance, $25 on the day of the event to benefit the Friends of McMillan Park's efforts to save this registered national historic landmark is greatly appreciated.  Even if you are unable to join our tour, please consider a donation to help support these efforts.  You can donate via PayPal or Crowdrise links on the web page, www.friendsofmcmillan.org/merchandise, or in person with cash or credit card with FOMP's Square account on the day of the event. 



          *****News*****

            


-  The D.C. Court of Appeals overruled the District's plan to
   demolish most of the McMillan  site and put up a huge
   development in a decision dated December 8, 2016 (one
   day after the Mayor's official groundbreaking event for the
   project). The court also remanded a series of questions
   for the Zoning Commission and the Mayor's Agent for 

   Historic Preservation to consider, and hearings were
   held on those questions late last year. Earlier this year
   those two offices issued their final decisions on the
   remand -- siding with the city once again and affirming
   the development project.  So Friends of McMillan Park is
   working right now to bring these decisions -- that we
   obviously disagree with -- back to the D.C. Court of
   Appeals for reconsideration.  No dates for oral arguments
   have been set, and the matter will be presented in two
   parts this time: one court case for the preservation
   aspect, one for the zoning aspect. 

 

- DMPED/DGS/Gilbane Construction Company has
   commenced historic preservation
 and rehabilitation/
   stabilization work on the regulator houses and the
   sand silos
 in the north and south service courts. We
   are supportive of this work because it's long overdue
   (the site has been a D.C. Historic District since
   1991) and the District is arguably guilty of demolition
   by neglect if it does NOT do this work. No other parts
   of the site are affected by this work. If you see building
   activity on McMillan, that's what it is, and that's
   ALL that it is -- no demolition or construction going on.

- Effective September 9, 2018, Bloomingdale
   is a new historic district, adjacent to but separate from
   McMillan Park Reservoir Historic District,
   see more on that here.  


Thank you for your continued interest and support, 

John Salatti, Kirby Vining, and Hugh Youngblood
Board of Directors, Friends of McMillan Park, Inc. 

If you have any questions, please contact restoremcmillan@gmail.com or call 202 then 213.2690.




Thursday, August 16, 2018

08-14-2018 HPO raze application report includes 150 S Street NW

From: HistoricWashington@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, August 15, 2018 5:08 PM
To: HistoricWashington@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [HistoricWashington] Raze Application Report - August 14, 2018
 
 
Greetings: This report is also posted on our website at http://tinyurl.com/h9nn5nf   .  See Raze Permit Report – August 14, 2018. 
The following raze applications were filed at the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) between July 11 – August 13, 2018: 
ANC             Address                                
1C             1418 Meridian Place NW (two story brick rowhouse)                                                          
1C             3305 18th Street NW (frame carriage house, Mt. Pleasant HD, per HPRB approval) 
1C             3601 14th Street NW (two story single family dwelling) 
2F             2100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW ( eight story concrete/steel office building)   
3D            4620 Cathedral Avenue NW (two story single family dwelling) 
3F            2400 Foxhall Road NW (2.5 story brick and frame single family dwelling) 
3F            3900 Wisconsin Avenue NW ( three story parking garage)            
4D           1210 Holly Street NW (frame one car garage) 
4D           4111 Kansas Avenue NW (brick/block warehouse) 
5E      150 S Street NW (three story brick church) 
5E            1265 Hamlin Street NE ( two story single family dwelling) 
6A           1603 Isherwood Street NE ( remaining front wall of burned out brick rowhouse)  
6E            1215 3rd Street NE ( two story brick/block warehouse) 
6E            55,57, 59, 61, 63, 65, 67 Q Street SW (two story brick townhouses) 
6E            69 Q Street SW (two story frame semi-detached rowhouse) 
6E            1535 Half Street SW (two story brick townhouse) 
7E            1900 Massachusetts Avenue SE (three story brick hospital – Building 29) 
7E            5127  Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue NE (two story brick semi-detached building) 
8D            4656  Livingston Road SE (one story block/brick commercial building)
 ______  

Historic Preservation Clearance of Raze Permit Applications

All raze permit applications in the District of Columbia are submitted to the Historic Preservation Office (HPO) for clearance. The Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA) gives applicants a blank clearance letter to submit to HPO for this purpose.

Why does HPO review all raze permit applications?
HPO clearance of raze applications safeguards against demolition of historic properties by accident or without proper public notice. HPO also ensures that raze applications subject to review under the DC historic preservation law are processed appropriately.

Why is public notice of raze applications important?
District law requires public notice of raze permit applications for both historic and non-historic property. This is because building demolition is often a matter of interest to affected residents and communities. In addition, the DC historic preservation law allows community groups to seek temporary and permanent protection for any property that may meet the criteria for historic landmark designation.

What is the public notice requirement?
Two types of public notice are required for raze applications before a permit is issued:
  • The DC Building Code requires the permit applicant to post and maintain a notice of the application on the property for 30 days (12A DCMR § 105.7.1).
  • The Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC) Act requires DCRA to give ANCs a notice of 30 working days, which is usually about 45 days (D.C. Official Code § 1-309.10(c)). DCRA sends this notice by email.
The public notice of raze permit applications establishes a review period during which communities may seek information and consider historic preservation concerns about a property proposed for demolition.

How can I determine when the public review period ends?
HPO posts copies of pending raze permit applications on the Office of Planning website . This posting includes a copy of the DCRA notice to ANCs. The public review period expires 30 working days after the date of the DCRA notice.

How long does the HPO review take?
HPO reviews raze applications promptly and in accordance with public notice requirements. The procedures and timing are different for historic and non-historic property.
For non-historic property, HPO typically holds applications for the length of the required ANC notice period. HPO may also request photographs to confirm posting of the notice placard on the property. If an application clearly raises no historic preservation concerns, HPO may use its discretion to sign off on the application before the notice period expires.
For historic property, HPO reviews the application according to the procedures required in the DC historic preservation law. The law discourages demolition of historic landmarks and properties contributing to the character of historic districts. Typically, an application to raze a historic property must be referred to the Historic Preservation Review Board for a recommendation, and to the Mayor’s Agent for a public hearing.

What if applications to raze and designate a property as historic are on file at the same time?
The DC historic preservation law allows ANCs and community groups with a demonstrated interest in historic preservation to file applications for historic designation at any time. Once an application to designate a historic landmark is filed with HPO, the property is protected by law for 90 days to allow HPRB time to determine whether the property meets historic landmark designation criteria. This protection does not apply to properties covered by historic district applications.
During this 90-day temporary protection period, the District may not issue the raze permit for the property. If HPRB determines after a public hearing that the property meets the designation criteria, it becomes a historic landmark and receives permanent protection under the preservation law. If HPRB determines that the property does not meet the criteria, HPO completes the preservation review by clearing the raze application.

How does HPO clear raze applications?
HPO clears the raze application by signing the DCRA clearance letter attached to the application. The clearance means either the property is not subject to the preservation law, or the demolition has been authorized under the preservation law.
HPO notifies the raze permit applicant once the HPO clearance letter is signed. Cleared applications are available for pick-up at the front reception desk in the Office of Planning during regular business hours (Monday to Friday, 8:30 am – 5:30 pm).

For More Information
Contact HPO by telephone at (202) 442-7600, or by email at historic.preservation@dc.gov


Bruce Yarnall • Historic Preservation Operations Manager
DC Office of Planning
1100 4th Street SW, Suite E650 • Washington, DC 20024
202.442.8835

get ready for the Meats and Foods Tiny Pary IV -- Friday, 08-17-2018

See this tweet:




LeDroit Park Block Party/Community Day -- Saturday, 08-18-2018

From: LeDroitPark@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, August 9, 2018 10:44 PM
To: LeDroitPark@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [LeDroitPark] LeDroit Park Block Party / Community Day * August 18, 2018 [1 Attachment]
  

[Attachment(s) from Ethan Arnheim included below]

Please join your neighbors next Saturday for LeDroit Park's annual Block Party / Community Day!

Saturday, August 18
1 pm - 5 pm on the 400 block of T St NW

We will have free food and beverages thanks to the LeDroit Park Civic Association, Shaw Tavern, and the LeDroit Park Market.

We will have exciting door prizes thanks to Fishscale, the Royal, and Electric Cat Scratch Tattoos

We will have great music and children's activities.

We will also be marking the launch of the newly named Ernest Everett Just Court, which runs from the 1800 block of 4th to the 1800 block of 5th.
You can help with setup and operations - especially if you have a grill we could use for the BBQ. Chairs and games are also welcome contributions.. 

Finally, make sure you are a member and help support our neighborhood. Membership is $15 per household, $5 for seniors or residents facing hardship. Join here: http://www.ledroitparkdc.org/join/


help inventory the Park at LeDroit trees with Casey Trees -- Saturday, 08-18-2018

See this tweet:




one week from today: Battle of the Bands at Boundary Stone

See this tweet:




MPD: Robbery on the 200 block of T Street NW

See this tweet:




Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

"Pride is picking up" signage at the dog park at the Park at LeDroit

See this tweet:


new foundation at 79-81 U Street NW - where two new construction rowhouses will be built

Some pics for you:






a new standard for displaying permits in the neighborhood

Here you go -- at 107 Rhode Island Avenue NW:


Fancy way of displaying permits.

Google-Street-View-Mobile out and around in Bloomingdale

Some neighbors have commented at seeing the Google Street View tooling around the streets of Bloomingdale.


Laughing With AuGusto: high frequency humor at Big Bear -- tonight, Tuesday, 08-14-2018

Here is the link to this event at Big Bear Cafe:






one week from today: #BattleoftheBarrelAgedBeer at Boundary Stone

Which local brewery will win this year? 

Monday, August 13, 2018

agenda for the Thursday, 09-27-2018, HPRB hearing includes two Bloomingdale historic district cases: 150 S St NW raze brick church and 1634 North Capitol St NW concept/new construction

See this notice from the DC Historic Preservation Office (HPO) regarding the Thursday, 09-27-2018, potential Historic Preservation Review Board (HPRB) hearing agenda.

There are two Bloomingdale historic district cases on the agenda:

150 S Street NW raze brick church
1634 North Capitol Street NW concept/new construction ("The Denizen")

Here is a link to The Denizen project by Maedwell Companies.



Curbed DC: "DC's newest historic district: Bloomingdale"

Click on the link to read the entire Curbed DC post.

I have included the first two paragraphs and the last paragraph.



Northwest’s Bloomingdale neighborhood became the city’s newest historic district by a unanimous vote of preservation officials late last month.
On July 26, the Historic Preservation Review Board (HPRB) approved, 8-0, the designation of Bloomingdale as a historic district. The change will go into effect on Sept. 9 and means that any new construction, demolition, or exterior work that requires city permits must first clear historic preservation review.

In September, the HPRB will hear its first individual cases for the Bloomingdale Historic District, per a new meeting notice. One involves the planned demolition of a brick church at 150 S St. NW and the other involves prospective construction at 1634 North Capitol St. NW.



the October Sessions are back at Big Bear Cafe -- Sunday, 08-19-2018

See this Big Bear Cafe Facebook post:


x


The Unified Scene Theater September-October 2018 classes now registering!

The Unified Scene Theater September-October Classes Now Registering! 

Bloomingdale’s own The Unified Scene Theater (80 T Street NW) is currently registering for our latest round of Sept-Oct classes, to include a one-day fiction-writing workshop, a storytelling class, an Introduction To Improv class, and our popular Improv For Business Leaders class. Check 'em out! 

Jump-Start Your Short-Story/Novel — A One-Day Writing Workshop: September 16th (1 p.m. to 6 p.m.)

Our Storytelling For Performance Class: Mondays, 7– 9pm, Monday, September 17th through Monday, October 22nd (four weeks of instruction, with a graduation show the evening of week five, on October 22nd; NO CLASS on October 8th)

Our September Weekly Introduction To Improv Class: Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., September 18th through October 30th; six classes on Tuesdays evenings, with a graduation show in week seven on the evening of October 30th  

Our Improvisation For Business Leaders Class: Wednesdays, 7-9 pm, September 19th through Wednesday, October 24th (a five week class that meets weekly on Wednesdays, with a graduation show in week six, on October 24th)

In our one-day Jump Start Your Short-Story/Novel class, you'll learn to get unstuck in that fiction piece you've been working on. Come dust it off, reenergize it and learn new writing and motivational strategies from local DC writing guru Alicia Otulski. In the Storytelling For Performance class, we will teach you the art of storytelling for performance, including: identifying the stories in our lives that make for great content; the narrative structure of a story; shaping that story for an audience; and then performing on stage in a graduation showcase and having the opportunity to invite friends and family to see you perform. In the Introduction To Improv class above, we’ll focus on and take a deeper dive into some of the things that make improv both fun and rewarding: agreement, commitment, energy, and context through exercises and games that demonstrate the fundamental principles behind this fun and exciting art form. In the Improv For Business Leaders class, we’ll take an even deeper dive into some of the things you were exposed to in your most recent class, and learn to apply the principles of improvisation to your careers by enhancing and improving the skills that make you a better communicator, collaborator, and leader. 

Ready to register? Cool. Click on the links below! 


See you on The ’Scene! 
     
Shawn and Kathy 

Shawn Westfall
Artistic Director
The Unified Scene Theater
shawn@unifiedscenetheater.com


Painted Palettes

See this tweet:




tonight at Boundary Stone: Best Damn Open Mic

See this tweet:





starting two weeks from today: "Free To Be Me" summer camp at St. George's Episcopal Church

From: Janis Evans  
Sent: Monday, August 6, 2018 12:43 PM
Subject:
FTBM Summer Camp Info

Hello Parents, Volunteers, and Community Partners,

It’s time for our annual “Free To Be Me” camp at Saint George’s Church in Ward 5! [See attached files] It’s a little different this year, scheduled for the last week of August, during the second week of school. We are hoping to offer an after school camp with the intention of extending into the school year, a couple days a week. Please pass this along and let me know if you are interested in volunteering for the camp or helping plan an after school program during the school year.

Thank you in advance,

Janis Evans,
Program Coordinator


MPD alert: Robbery While Armed on the unit block of Thomas St NW at 23:00 hours



From: AlertDC
Sent: Sunday, August 12, 2018 11:16 PM
Subject: Crime Alert 5th District (PSA 501-508)

This is an important message from the District of Columbia AlertDC system.

Alert: Robbery While Armed at 2300 hrs in the 100 block of Thomas St NW. Lookout for B/M, black jacket, blue pants, riding a green scooter. L/S westbound toward 2nd/Thomas St NW.
                                                                   
DO NOT TAKE ACTION CALL 911 W/ EVENT #I20180466562
Sent to 5th District (PSA 501-508) Alert DC
Sent by MPD Cad # 9314



Sunday, August 12, 2018

undated Atlas Obscura post on McMillan

A neighbor passes along this Atlas Obscura post on the McMillan Sand Filtration site.  I can't find a date associated with this post.

I have copied the first two paragraphs of this post.

Here is the link to read the entire entry and to see the images.


Shortly after the new city reservoir was completed at Howard University, Congress authorized funds for an adjacent filtration site to address the public health situation. The facility relied entirely on sand to clean the water; at the time, this method scaled better and was more cost effective than using chemicals.
“Raw water” came in from the reservoir next door and slowly percolated through the sand in 25 vaulted underground cells before making its way out into District taps. The 4-foot lining of sand actually did a remarkable job at removing bacteria and sediment from the water.
...

brunch at Crisp Kitchen and Bar

See this tweet: