Wednesday, April 16, 2008

another future development post- Old Sand Filtration Plant

old

The Neighborhoods of EYA
Jair Lynch Development Partners

WARD 5 COUNCILMEMBER HARRY "TOMMY" THOMAS, JR., THE DEPUTY MAYOR FOR PLANNING & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & VISION MCMILLAN PARTNERS

Invite you to a

Community Visioning
Session on the
Development of the
McMillan Sand Filtration Site

Tuesday April 22, 2008
6:30 pm to 9 pm
O'Connor Auditorium, Trinity University
125 Michigan Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20017


THE GOAL OF THIS MEETING IS TO HEAR THE COMMUNITY'S THOUGHTS AND IDEAS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE. WE ENCOURAGE STRONG ATTENDANCE AND WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!


Discussion Topics will include:

* Existing Condition of the Site

* Potential Uses & Opportunities - Open Space, Historic Preservation, Mixed-Income & Multi-Generational Housing, Community Serving Retail, Job Creating Office Space, Hospitality, and Community, Education, and Cultural Space

* Key Community Issues - Traffic/Smart Growth, Infrastructure, Community Benefits, LSDBE Participation, Job Creation, Sustainable/Green Development, and Other Issues


Light Food and Parking Provided.

For More Information, Contact
Vicky Chambers, Office of CM Thomas, at 202-727-8204
John Basile, EYA, at 301-634-8600
the skies over DC

Vision McMillan Partners, the development team for the site, includes:

* EYA
* Jair Lynch Development Partners
* StreetSense
* The Alexander Company
* MacFarlane Partners
* Smoot & Urban Service Systems Corporation

7 comments:

  1. Woow, I just passed this the other day, saying what a waste of land. I know one thing, I would prefer it not be me used for housing...maybe some businesses of some sort!

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  2. I think this whole area, especially with the lake is beautiful as is, but I suppose it would be a waste not to develop it. Hopefully the character of the plant will somehow be preserved, although that will be one unique development. I just love that water, though, with the geese! What do you think could be done there that would actually look decent and attend to the needs of the community?

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  3. Hi there,

    Congratulations on your community visioning successes!

    I live in Dunn County, Wisconsin, and our community is involved in a similar visioning process.

    The DCCV project asks citizens what they value in their community and what they would like to preserve and change. Through scenario planning, research and dialogue these common views and dreams of the whole community are shaped into a plan which becomes the foundation for strategic direction.

    Our project has been chosen as one of the Top 20 out of 5000 for a Case Foundation award - now we are in the running for $25,000 to keep our work going.

    Please use the voting link below to vote for DCCV and your other top three choices. It would be much appreciated if you could forward this link to your friends and contacts as well.

    https://vote.election-america.com/make-it-your-own/

    I believe Case will be running this grant program again next August; I strongly encourage your group to apply!

    If you have any questions please feel free to contact me at:

    608.695.4196

    Thank you in advance for voting and sharing with others : )

    Bridget Murphy
    murphyb@uwstout.edu

    ReplyDelete
  4. this isnt the parcel of land with the water, thats the reservoir. this is the old sand filtration site on the east side of first street NW. its not longer a functioning plant.


    more than likely any development will include mixed use and include affordable housing.

    bridget,
    thanks.

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  5. I live two blocks from the sand filtration site, and will be taking a very close (and skeptical) look at their plans. Since Bloomingdale can't seem to support a single sit-down restaurant, why do we think some sort of glorious high-end retail is going in here? Based on recent experience with Brentwood Center, they will have to settle for check cashing, low-end clothing, or hair/nails.

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  6. dear god, please please PLEASE just make it urban, make it fit in with the grid. no parking lots, no suburban infill. do it right for god's sake.

    (i'm going to be there, and i'm going to make my thoughts known)

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  7. I am as sceptical as others having lived three blocks from the ole 25 acre sand filtration plant for over 25 yrs. DC bought the site for $9.3 m in 1987 and let it deteriorate and failed to get development to occur even during the roaring 90's. The site was designated a DC Historic Landmark in 1991. I have no idea what really will happen to it but no one wants strip malls, cheaply-built housing or bad traffic planning to drag the neighborhood down. Any developer going in there has to deal with the cost of digging out the huge concrete vaults that were used for sand filtration of water and tearing down the water towers. Maybe it should just become a park and museum. We need more greenspace, don't we?

    ReplyDelete